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QSLs from Japan’s Overseas Service – Radio Japan/NHK World Radio Japan.

Over time, Radio Japan has crafted an array of captivating QSL cards. The earliest in this compilation harks back to 1969 when Radio Japan solely broadcasted from Yamata, Japan. Since then, their reach has extended to over 20 different sites, primarily through lease agreements. During the late 1970s and early 1980s, I had the honor of serving as an official monitor for Radio Japan.

In the 1990s, NHK opted to rebrand its overseas service, transitioning from Radio Japan to NHK World Radio Japan. Despite the name change, the station’s essence remains unaltered.

At present, my collection comprises 54 distinctive QSL issues originating from 18 transmitter sites. It’s probable that more additions will enrich the collection in the future..

Click on the thumbnails for a closer examination.

My First QSL Card –
Radio Japan 15105 kHz –
18 August 1969

R_Japan_Yamata_19690819_15105_a

This is my first QSL card. It bears a lot of battle scars from being tacked and taped to the wall. However, I still have fond memories about this card. As a kid, I always had an interest in listening to the radio. Besides the local stations, I began to notice that there were stations in between. Little did I know that that other people did this also as a hobby called DXing.

In those days, our household boasted a Grundig Satellite 2000 radio, a device that became my gateway to unraveling the mysteries of those distant transmissions. I’d tinker with its knobs, navigating through the bands marked SW, inquisitive about the voices and melodies emanating from afar. Then, one fateful day, I tuned into the 19 Meter Band and was greeted by an entrancing melody, punctuated by intermittent announcements. Among them, I distinctly heard Japanese phrases followed by a crisp English voice proclaiming, “This is Radio Japan, the international broadcasting service of NHK in Tokyo.” The realization hit me like a wave – a radio signal traversing the vast expanse of the Pacific Ocean from Japan to my humble receiver. I was spellbound, captivated by the entire program.

In those days, our household boasted a Grundig Satellite 2000 radio, a device that became my gateway to unraveling the mysteries of those distant transmissions. I’d tinker with its knobs, navigating through the bands marked SW, inquisitive about the voices and melodies emanating from afar. Then, one fateful day, I tuned into the 19 Meter Band and was greeted by an entrancing melody, punctuated by intermittent announcements. Among them, I distinctly heard Japanese phrases followed by a crisp English voice proclaiming, “This is Radio Japan, the international broadcasting service of NHK in Tokyo.” The realization hit me like a wave – a radio signal traversing the vast expanse of the Pacific Ocean from Japan to my humble receiver. I was spellbound, captivated by the entire program. At its conclusion, an invitation echoed through the airwaves, beckoning listeners to submit reception reports in exchange for a prized QSL card.

R_Japan_Yamata_19690819_15105_b

Weeks later, a package arrived from Japan, sparking excitement within our home. With trembling hands, I unwrapped it to reveal a treasure trove: a program schedule, a newspaper from Radio Japan, and, nestled within, the coveted QSL card displayed before you. That moment marked the beginning of an enduring passion. From then on, I was hooked, and the rest, as they say, is history.